Anne Hegerty baffled by person 'upset' seeing Union Flag on porridge

The Chase’s Anne Hegerty mocks Twitter user who claims they felt ‘intimidated’ and ‘upset’ after seeing the Union Flag on a box of Mornflake porridge in Morrisons

  • Anonymous Twitter used claimed they felt ‘intimidated’ and ‘upset’ after seeing the Union Flag on a box of Mornflake porridge in a branch of Morrisons  
  • Anne Hegerty asked whether they was also ‘upset’ by Irish porridge Flahavans
  • Continued to question if it was just the ‘British’ one person was offended by

Anne Hegerty has been left baffled by a Twitter user who claimed they felt ‘intimidated’ and ‘upset’ after seeing the Union Flag on a box of Mornflake porridge in Morrisons.

The quiz star, 62, responded to a Tweet from an anonymous social media user who posted a snap of the cereal aisle in the supermarket and penned: ‘Very upset by porridge I saw in Morrison’s. This flagging everything is very unpleasant and quite intimidating.’

Anne replied by asking the person in question whether they were also ‘upset’ by Irish porridge Flahavans, which could be seen placed on a shelf nearby, or whether it ‘just applied to the British one.’  

And many were quick to take to the comments section – with many branding it ‘pathetic’ to be ‘intimidated’ by porridge.

‘Please tell me this is a parody account. Intimidated by s**ding porridge,’ wrote one, while a second penned: ‘This has to be a parody account as no one in real life could genuinely be upset by a product box on a supermarket shelf displaying its country of origin. Because that would be pathetic.’ 

Anne Hegerty, 62, has been left baffled by a Twitter user who claimed they felt ‘intimidated’ and ‘upset’ after seeing the Union Flag on a box of Mornflake porridge in a branch of Morrisons (pictured)

The anonymous social media user penned: ‘Very upset by porridge I saw in Morrison’s. This flagging everything is very unpleasant and quite intimidating’ (pictured)

Anne replied by asking whether the person in question was also ‘upset’ by Irish porridge Flahavans, which could be seen in the photo placed on a shelf nearby, or whether it was just the ‘British’ one they were offended by. Pictured, on The Chase

Anne penned: ‘Is it the Irish porridge that’s upsetting them, or does it only apply to the British one?’ (pictured)

The initial Tweet that sparked the controversial thread was posted by a user who shared a photo of Morrisons’ eggs branded with the Union Jack flag.

They penned: ‘Just back from a trip to Morrison’s Is it just me, or have their butter and eggs always been this…patriotic?’ 

A second ‘upset’ person then contributed to the thread with the suggestion that he was ‘intimated’ by the porridge in a branch of Morrisons – which caused quite the stir online.  

In response Anne penned: ‘Is it the Irish porridge that’s upsetting them, or does it only apply to the British one?’ leading another to reply:   

‘Considering that the people who get upset about such things often have Irish tricolours & Scottish saltires in their bios (along with EU flags), I doubt it.’   

Taking to the comments section, one person penned: ‘Please tell me this is a parody account. Intimidated by s**ding porridge’ (pictured)

A third wrote: ‘Reading through some of the comments here reacting to this tweet are nothing but very unpleasant and quite intimidating,’ while a fourth agreed: ‘That’s because it’s buy British, farmed in the UK, fresh produce from local farmers etc, what’s intimidating about that!?’

A fifth penned: ‘Intimidated by porridge? Let’s hope you never have to face anything more scary in your life,’ while a fifth joked: ‘Quakering in their boots?’

Another commented: ‘How many different brands of porridge oats does one supermarket need?!? Despite the obvious nationality difference surely they are all much the same? Maybe you can taste race/religion.’ 

And while Anne went on to admit to her 151,000 social media followers that she usually buys the own-brand version of pretty much anything, her colleague Darragh Ennis joked that the ‘Irish one’ needed to have more flags in a bid to compete. 

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