Bachelor and bachelorette parties to see 2021 boom just like weddings: survey

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‘The Knot’ executive director Lauren Kay discusses the recent rise in weddings and how to plan one in the pandemic.

While the lingering coronavirus pandemic is contributing to a "wedding boom" for 2021, people are also planning to drop some serious cash on bachelor and bachelorette parties.

A limited survey conducted by WeddingWire consulted 274 men and 366 women to find out what their past or future "bach" party plans were from April to December. According to the wedding planning platform, bachelor and bachelorette party attendees are celebrating longer than they did in 2019 with three days of partying on average compared to pre-COVID’s two. 

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WeddingWire’s study suggests these pre-wedding gatherings are likely getting more elaborate to make up for the time that was lost from the pandemic.

"As we round the corner following last year, people are excited about the opportunity to make plans with friends and family again, and they’re willing to spare no expense in order to do so," Sam Iacia, a WeddingWire editor told Fox News via email. "They’re ready to get together and have fun celebrating everything that they couldn’t in 2020, which also explains the wedding boom we’re starting to see."

With these longer celebrations, party spending has climbed with the additional activities and travel expenses that are being tacked on by hosts and attendees. According to WeddingWire, 51% of bachelor and bachelorette attendees are willing to put down close to $1,000 or more for an upcoming party.

Common bachelor party activities for 2021 include live shows like concerts and comedy hours and brunch events, according to WeddingWire. (iStock)

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Meanwhile, 97% of bachelor and bachelorette parties in 2021 will be "overnight events" that require a hotel stay or vacation rental. Another 25% told WeddingWire they’ll be traveling to a bride or groom’s party by plane.

In terms of where bachelors and bachelorettes are going to celebrate this year, Miami, Las Vegas, New York City, Los Angeles and Orlando are the top five destinations men are looking at while women have their eyes on New York City, Miami, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Nashville.

For the big spenders who are looking for a tropical beach getaway to kick off a bachelor or bachelorette party, Hawaii, Mexico and the Caribbean are top picks.

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When it comes down to bachelor party activities, WeddingWire says more men are going to live shows like concerts and comedy hours and brunch events. Women on the other hand are celebrating with brunches, winery or brewery tours, dancing, barhopping, karaoke and party bus rides.

Common bachelorette party activities for 2021 include brunches, winery or brewery tours, dancing, barhopping, karaoke and party bus rides, according to WeddingWire. (iStock)

Men are likely to be outspent by women in the special attire category. Only 39% of men told WeddingWire they plan to buy clothes for the bachelor who’s getting married while 61% of women said they plan on doing the same for the bachelorette.

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Overall though, three in four men (74%) admitted to WeddingWire that they plan to spend more money on bachelor parties "now that COVID restrictions have loosened" compared to the two in three women (66%) who admitted they plan to spend more. 

"This trend of ‘bigger and better' is happening because people are ready to make memories again. They’re making up for lost time and don’t want to take any opportunity for granted," Iacia wrote to Fox News. "After many months of restrictions, people are ready to travel, go out to dinner, and make the most of life—and they’re willing to spend whatever it takes to get there."

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WeddingWire’s bachelor and bachelorette party study from last year looked very different with smaller guest lists, casual nights at home and postponed celebrations.

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