Chinese climbers reach the summit of Mount Everest

Chinese surveyors reach the summit of Mount Everest to remeasure the peak in a bid to end a long-running debate with Nepal over the precise height of the mountain

  • Eight Chinese mountaineers arrived at the peak of Mount Everest at 11am today
  • They were tasked to remeasure the exact height of the world’s tallest mountain 
  • Rare footage shows the survey team reaching the snow-capped summit point
  • China aims to settle a long-running dispute with Nepal over the height of Everest

A team of Chinese surveyors have arrived at the peak of Mount Everest today for remeasuring to settle what media calls a long-standing dispute with Nepal over the exact height of the world’s tallest mountain. 

Eight Chinese mountaineers arrived at the summit point of Mount Everest at 11am local time after climbing for nine hours, Chinese state media reported. 

Nepal and China have jointly launched a scientific research project to determine the exact height of Everest since April, an expedition described by Chinese government as ‘an eternal symbol of the friendship between the two countries’.

This is the moment a Chinese survey team today became the first group to reach the peak of Mount Everest this year as part of a part of a project to remeasure the exact height of the world’s tallest mountain. A screenshot released by CCTV shows the climbers at the summit

A team of eight Chinese mountaineers arrived at the summit of Mount Everest at 11am local time today after climbing for nine hours. The picture captures the extraordinary moment climbers reaching the summit point of the 29,029 ft mountain buried in deep snow

Telescope video camera footage released by state broadcaster CCTV Wednesday captures the extraordinary moment climbers reaching the summit point buried in deep snow. 

The mountain, lies in the Himalayas on the border between China and Nepal, has been the centre of a debate between the two countries for years, according to South China Morning Post. 

Since 2005, China has declared the precise height of Mount Everest to be 8,844 metres (29,017 feet), which is four metres lower than Nepal. 

After Chinese President Xi Jinping’s state visit to Nepal last October, the two countries agreed to remeasure the height of the mountain in a bid to end the long-standing dispute once for all.

A 53-member team from China’s Ministry of National Resources has been conducting scientific work on Everest since early March. 

At 2:10am local time Wednesday, eight Chinese climbers from the team set off from their base camp at an altitude of 5,200 metres (17,060 feet) on a conquest to reach the summit of the world’s tallest mountain.

They completed the surveying work at around 1:30pm local time and started returning to the camp, Chinese media report. 

China’s network of Beidou satellites is being used in the survey to determine the mountain’s current height and natural resources, state media Xinhua reported.

Data on snow depth, weather and wind speed is also being measured to aid in glacier monitoring and ecological protection. 

Experts believe the ascent will enhance human knowledge of nature and help boost scientific development, according to state media Xinhua. 

Pictured, a member of the Chinese surveying team sets up a survey equipment on the summit of Mount Everest, known in China as Qomolangma after they reached the peak at 11am local time today as part of China’s mission to remeasure the height of the world’s tallest mountain

At 2:10am local time Wednesday, the team of Chinese climbers set off from their base camp on a conquest to reach the summit of Mount Everest. Pictured, other members who remained at the team’s base camp celebrate their eight team members reaching the peak of Mount Everest

China has previously conducted six major surveys of the mountain, known in China as Qomolangma, since the establishment of the People´s Republic in 1949. The successful summiting today would mark the country’ seventh conquest.

But only the surveying results from two ascents have been revealed to the public, according to the press. Mount Everest’s height was registered by China at 8,848.13 metres (29,029 feet) in 1975 and 8,844.43 metres (29,017 feet) in 2005. 

It comes after both China and Nepal cancelled the spring climbing season on the mountain that straddles their border in a bid to prevent the new coronavirus from spreading among expedition teams that typically live for weeks in tightly packed camps with little access to emergency medical help. 

China has also taken advantage of the lack of climbers to collect garbage from Everest and other popular climbing peaks, the report said. 

China has previously conducted six major surveys of the mountain, known in China as Qomolangma, since the establishment of the People´s Republic in 1949. Pictured, members of a Chinese surveying team head for the summit point of Mount Everest on May 27

A 53-member team from China´s Ministry of National Resources has been conducting scientific work on Everest since early March. In this photo taken on May 16, Chinese surveyors hike toward a higher spot from the base camp on Mount Everest at an altitude of 5,200 metres 

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